Google Shopping–Pictures Missing?


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010
(This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.)

Now you’re syndicated, you’ve searched Google Shopping and found your items there but you’ve got no pictures–just this graphic?


Then your pictures are most likely too big.

If you are selling on Etsy, they have made these recommendations:

Minimum: 430 pixels wide
Maximum: 800 to 1,000 pixels wide or long on the largest side

Narrower images will be pixelated/blurry in the item listing because Etsy will stretch them to fit the 430 pixel-wide space on the listing page.

Larger images are slow to load which is:

bad for folks with older computers
bad for folks with dial-up connections

and now, it’s also

bad for uploading to Google Merchant Center which provides data for Google’s Shopping/Product search.

What to do?

You can either lower the setting on your camera or use photo editing program to make them smaller. If you don’t have photo editing software, you try these two free ones:

Picasa (from what I hear it’s relatively simple)
http://picasa.google.com

GIMP (more advanced)
http://www.gimp.org/windows

Need help getting the image sizes right for cropping on Etsy?

See this post:

Image Cropping for Etsy
http://www.gotogreatpanes.com/blog/2010/04/08/image-cropping-for-etsy

Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010
(This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.)

Download Your Paypal History


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010
This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.

Looking for your Paypal fees history or sales tax you collected through Paypal? It’s all in the history download from Paypal!

To download your history:

1. Log in to your Paypal account & hover over the History link, click the Download History link from the pop up menu.

2. On the right there’s a box with links, click Customize Download Fields.

That allows you to control the information you get & how you get it. Be sure to select shipping amount, insurance amount, sales tax and any other information you need. Click save at the bottom of that page.

I like to download it all and save it for my business records.

3. Select Custom Date Range and put in the dates you need records from.

If you have hundreds of transactions during the time frame you select you may have to change the dates and download a few months at a time so the download won’t time out.

4. From the drop down File Types for Download menu select Tab Delimited.

I like the all activity version.

5. At the bottom click the “Download History” button.

6. When download box pops up click to save the file to your computer.

We have a folder where we keep all our business transactions, I save it there, some folks save items to “My Documents”, wherever you’ll be able to find it is fine. I give it a name that reflects the contents and the date range, for example my March 2010 file name will be: PP history 03 10.txt

7. Once you’ve saved the file, go to the folder on your computer where you saved it and change the file extension from .txt to .xls so that Excel can open it and will automatically put all the data in separate columns for you.

To change the extension right click on the file name and select rename, edit it then hit enter (on a Mac, use ctrl + click for the right click):

From: PP history 03 10.txt
To: PP history 03 10.xls

8. Double-click the file name to open it. All your transaction data should be there now, separated into individual columns.

To add up a column, for example, your sales tax:

9. Click once on the first sales tax collected entry–that selects that box (I’m not sure what the column header is as we can’t use Paypal to accurately collect NY sales tax so our file doesn’t have that column).

10. Hold down the shift key and then hold down the down-arrow key to highlight the cells until you reach the end of the numbers you want to add, then click the down arrow one more time, highlighting one empty box at the end of the column. It should look like this:

11. At the top of the page click the big funny looking E in the menu bar–that will “auto-sum” the column. It will put the total in the empty box you highlighted at the bottom of the column. It should look like this:

12. All added up! In this example the total was $3.75.

This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010

Help for Filing your Federal Income Taxesfor Your Small Business


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010-2012
This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.

This time of year many folks seem to have questions about where different business expenses go in your annual income taxes.

Generally, you should get your answers from people in the know–that means directly from the IRS or from an accountant or tax preparer that has experience with small business taxes.

Non-official websites and forums are not a good place to get answers. You’ll never know if the person supplying the info actually has a good understanding of the laws or if they just talk a good game if you don’t go to the source.

In that vein, I offer a few official IRS website links that I have found very helpful. (Links open in a new window or tab depending on your browser settings.)

Do I Need to File a Tax Return? The IRS has tools to help you with that–and if you have to file, you need to report all income, no matter how small or if your business shows a loss/hobby only broke even: Do I Need to File?

Recordkeeping Info from the IRS
http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=98575,00.html

For sole proprietorships (info), we report our income and expenses on the Schedule C and submit it with our 1040 to the IRS (and to the state where required).

Form 1040, Schedule C, PDF file
http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f1040sc.pdf

This is the IRS’s instructions for the Schedule C:

Instructions for the 1040 Schedule C
http://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1040sc/index.html
(PDF version)

and the following one answers some of the questions for the Schedule C that the instructions for the Schedule C seem to ignore–it has saved me from many a headache:

Tax Guide for Small Business, Publication 334
(For Individuals Who Use Schedule C or C-EZ)
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p334/index.html
(PDF version: http://www.irs.gov/app/vita/globalmedia/p334.pdf)

Now don’t get overwhelmed by all this, these additional links will come in handy if you get stuck….

Some more tough topics in detail:

Business Expenses, Publication 535
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p535/index.html

Inventories—see Publication 538
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p538/index.html

Travel, Entertainment, Gift & Car Expenses, Pub 463
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p463/index.html

How To Depreciate Property, Publication 946
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p946/index.html

Business Use of Your Home, Publication 587
http://www.irs.gov/publications/p587/index.html

This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2010-2012

Google Analytics Set up for Etsy Shops


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2009
This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.

1. Log in to Google Analytics, click the “Analytics Settings” link on the left in the orange bar. That should put you on this page:
https://www.google.com/analytics/settings

a. If you haven’t set up your account already, you’ll need to put your shop address in on the “Add Website Profile” page. Click the “Add Website Profile” link below the “Website Profiles” section.

b. Select “http://” from the drop down menu and put in your shop address, for example goto.etsy.com or gotosupplies.etsy.com

2. On that page in the darkest gray bar, in the center, you’ll see it says “Website Profiles”. Below it lists your website followed by a number that starts with UA. That is your Google Analytics Tracking ID. I’ve outlined the number location in a green square on this image, click it for a larger view:

You need to copy that tracking ID into the box on the Web Analytics page in Your Etsy, so…

3. Log in to Etsy, and on the left side of “Your Etsy” under “Shop Setup” click the link for “Web Analytics”. That should put you on this page:
http://www.etsy.com/shop_analytics.php

4. Under “Step 2: Enter Tracking ID”, put the ID you just copied in the box, be sure the UA is capitalized and click the save changes button.

Done! Google will start tracking your shop now.

Looking for more help?

Etsy’s PDF file on Google Analytics:
http://www.etsy.com/storque/media/bunker/2009/03/GoogleAnalyticsForSellers.pdf

Now that you are tracking your traffic, it’s time to improve your search engine results:

Etsy: Meta Tags
http://www.gotogreatpanes.com/blog/2009/07/21/etsy-meta-tags

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) info straight from Google:
http://www.gotogreatpanes.com/blog/2009/06/22/search-engine-optimization

This post is copyrighted–you do not have permission to repost this content elsewhere but you are welcome to link to it if you’d like to share the information.


Visit our Etsy shop: GoTo
Go To Great Panes, Kathryn Maloney ©2009